Mar 15, 2018

Landlord Entering Home Without Permission

What should you do if a landlord enters into your property without your permission?

Arizona law requires that landlords give tenants at least a 48 hour notice prior to entering the property. However, what options do you have if the landlord just enters into the property? The Arizona Landlord Tenant Act addresses this exact issue. A.R.S. § 33-1376(B) states:
"If the landlord makes an unlawful entry or a lawful entry in an unreasonable manner or makes repeated demands for entry otherwise lawful but which have the effect of unreasonably harassing the tenant, the tenant may obtain injunctive relief to prevent the recurrence of the conduct or terminate the rental agreement. In either case, the tenant may recover actual damages not less than an amount equal to one month's rent."
So this statute provides an Arizona tenant with two different options if the landlord enters the property without permission or is constantly demanding to enter the property to the point that it becomes a form of harassment.

Two Options Available If Your Landlord Enters Without Your Permission

  1. Obtain injunctive relief- This is a fancy way of saying of getting an Injunction Against Harassment or Restraining Order against the landlord. With either of these tools you will have the backing of the court to stop the harassment. 
  2. Terminate the Rental Agreement- Regardless of how much or how little time is left on your lease if your landlord has entered your house without your permission then you can cancel your lease. 
Monetary Damages Against Trespassing Landlord

The second part of A.R.S. § 33-1376(B) requires the landlord to pay the tenant a "fine" equal to one month's rent. So for example, if your rent is $1,500 per month then you would be able to recover $1,500 from the landlord.

However, in order to recover the one months rent from the landlord a tenant must elect one of the two options from above. Meaning, the tenant must either obtain an Injunction Against Harassment or actually terminate the lease agreement. A tenant cannot just say, "well, the landlord entered my property without my permission and now I want my money."

If you have questions about a landlord entering a house without permission then email me at cdunaway@davismiles.com or call us at 480-344-4035.